fantomas-en-cavale:

Louis-Ferdinand Céline et Toto, Meudon, reportage de François Pagès pour Paris-Match, 1957

fantomas-en-cavale:

Louis-Ferdinand Céline et Toto, Meudon, reportage de François Pagès pour Paris-Match, 1957


"The worst part is wondering how you’ll find the strengh tomorrow to go on doing what you did today and have been doing for much too long, where you’ll find the strengh for all that stupid running around, those projects that come to nothing, those attempts to escape from crushing necessity, which always founder and serve only to convince you one more time that destinity is implacable, that every night will find you down and out, crushed by the dread of more and more sordid and insecure tommorrows."
Louis Ferdinand Céline, Death on Credit

"The worst part is wondering how you’ll find the strengh tomorrow to go on doing what you did today and have been doing for much too long, where you’ll find the strengh for all that stupid running around, those projects that come to nothing, those attempts to escape from crushing necessity, which always founder and serve only to convince you one more time that destinity is implacable, that every night will find you down and out, crushed by the dread of more and more sordid and insecure tommorrows."

Louis Ferdinand Céline, Death on Credit

(Source: the-night-picture-collector, via the-night-picture-collector)

thischarmingman1981:

The books we need, are the kind that act upon us like a misfortune, that makes us suffer like the death of someone we love more than ourselves, that make us feel as though we were on the verge of suicide, or lost in a forest remote from all human habitation, a book should serve as the axe for the frozen sea within us.



Franz Kafka


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Tales of an Extraordinary Madman
Lionel Rolfe, huffingtonpost.com
IN 1972, when I saw fel­low Los Ange­les Free Press writer Charles Bukows­ki’s book in the win­dow of a book­store in West Hamp­stead in Lon­don, my first reac­tion was one of jeal­ousy. The book was called Notes of a Dirty Old Man, …

Tales of an Extraordinary Madman
Lionel Rolfe, huffingtonpost.com

IN 1972, when I saw fel­low Los Ange­les Free Press writer Charles Bukows­ki’s book in the win­dow of a book­store in West Hamp­stead in Lon­don, my first reac­tion was one of jeal­ousy. The book was called Notes of a Dirty Old Man, …

penamerican:

"Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."
Happy Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

penamerican:

"Always do sober what you said you’d do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."

Happy Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

(via litterature)

litterature:

Happy birthday Hubert Selby Jr

From the bonus features section of the Requiem for a Dream DVD. One of the most influential conversations I’ve ever listened to … Selby displays himself openly and sincerely with Ellen Burnstyn, as they discuss the nature of his life and spirituality.

(Source: youtube.com)

vimg.net

storagegeek:

the-cinnamon-peelers-wife:

I need all of these. Need.

I love the Hemmingway and Salinger quotes. They would be perfect in my office.

(Source: ianbrooks, via pankmagazine)

theimpossiblecool:

“Find what you love and let it kill you.” 
Charles Bukowski, Los Angeles, 1982.

theimpossiblecool:

“Find what you love and let it kill you.” 

Charles Bukowski, Los Angeles, 1982.

pankmagazine:

image

From [PANK]’s Books We Can’t Quit series, Joseph Michael Owens talks Infinite Jest over on our blog.Read [here.]

What book can’t you quit?

17 Movie Posters Improved With Animation
Erin La Rosa, buzzfeed.com
This should be the future of all movie posters, IMO. Thanks to this awesome Imgur user for creating the poster art.

17 Movie Posters Improved With Animation
Erin La Rosa, buzzfeed.com

This should be the future of all movie posters, IMO. Thanks to this awesome Imgur user for creating the poster art.

Pulp Fiction

Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas

by Hunter S. Thompson, rollingstone.com

We were some­where around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. I remem­ber say­ing some­thing like “I feel a bit light­head­ed; maybe you should drive. …” And sud­den­ly there was a ter­ri­ble roar all around us a…

Charles Bukowski on Writing and His Crazy Daily Routine
Maria Popova, brainpickings.org
“Writing is like going to bed with a beautiful woman and afterwards she gets up, goes to her purse and gives me a handful of money.”The lat­est addi­tion to this ongo­ing omnibus of famous writ­ers’ advice on the craft comes from none other tha…

Charles Bukowski on Writing and His Crazy Daily Routine
Maria Popova, brainpickings.org

“Writing is like going to bed with a beautiful woman and afterwards she gets up, goes to her purse and gives me a handful of money.”

The lat­est addi­tion to this ongo­ing omnibus of famous writ­ers’ advice on the craft comes from none other tha…